I recently started learning React because it seems like it’s the new ‘it’ technology in town. My previous front end framework knowledge was limited to AngularJS. It took me some time to like it, but eventually I did. I might have an interview soon and the technologies the company uses are mainly Rails and AngularJS(v1.5). This has made me go back to Angular and start building again. It’s amazing how fast information leaks out of ones head.

The first thing I noticed when starting a project was that Bower has been deprecated. I knew that Bower was on its way out when I learned AngularJS, but that was only a few months ago. Things certainly change fast in the world of technology.

Note to self: don’t get too comfortable with any technologies you use.

So what to do? How should I handle my front end dependencies? There are many ways, some of which are already on the outs too – like Gulp. After doing some research it seems like the wave of now and the near future is Webpack. Even Rails is getting in on the action by including it with Rails 5.1. Rails is still in heavy use in the industry, however has seen some decline from the glory years. Most of the decline in usage has to do with all of the front end technologies that have sprouted up in the last five years. Rails was not keeping up with the trends and Rails’ dependency on the Asset Pipeline – once the best thing since sliced bread – was now hindering development.

Well, guess what? The team behind Rails has finally caught on and the inclusion of the Webpacker gem is a huge step in the right direction. I could see a big boost in Rails usage as a result. That’s great and all, but what does Webpack actually do? From the Webpack github page:

webpack is a module bundler. Its main purpose is to bundle JavaScript files for usage in a browser, yet it is also capable of transforming, bundling, or packaging just about any resource or asset.

When using Rails, it basically creates another asset pipeline for JavaScript files. Whenever learning something new, there will be a learning curve and some frustration involved. In my case, using Rails 5.0.1 and AngularJS(1.5.8), there has definitely been a bit of both. Especially since there’s not much documentation or tutorials for the versions I’m using. I’m finally making some headway and actually have a basic app running in my browser. There’s much more importing of files and such going on, which I became familiar with through React. This week I’m going to become much more familiar with the inner workings.

My next blog post will be a tutorial on getting Rails(5.0.1), AngularJS(1.5.8) and Webpack to all play nice together. Have you built anything with these technologies? Please comment below, I’d love to hear about it! Until next time…Cheers:)

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