Welcome back! We left off last time in a good place. We set up the back end by generating three models – User, Meal, and UserMeal (our joins table) – with associations. We used scaffolding to generate our models. In most cases, we would normally not generate models using scaffolding, because it creates a lot of things we won’t need. This causes bloat in our app, and if we want our app to scale nicely and be fast, this will be a problem. For our case (and our little app), it’s nice and easy to use scaffolding – so we did. Then we installed a great gem called Active Model Serializer, which formats our model data into reusable JSON, which our front end will consume. In this edition we’ll be installing AngularJS and Webpack. Let’s dive in.

Webpacker

A few blog posts ago, I wrote about Rails and the Webpacker gem. The team at Rails is definitely catching on to the current and future trends of the web – front end frameworks using JavaScript. The Webpacker gem makes it easier to use these frameworks with Rails. Enough talk though – let’s install it! Note – if you’re using Rails 5.1, you can run ‘rails new myapp –webpack=angular’ when initiating your app. Otherwise…

# In your gemfile.rb file, add 

gem 'webpacker'

# Back in your terminal

bundle 
bundle exec rails webpacker:install

# if you get an error that looks like this: 'Webpacker requires Yarn >= 0.25.2 
# and you are using 0.24.6
# Please upgrade Yarn https://yarnpkg.com/lang/en/docs/install/'
# do this:

npm install -g yarn

# if everything is honky dory

bundle exec rails webpacker:install:angular

Now we’re in the webpack business. Using webpack basically creates another asset pipeline for our JavaScript assets. Instead of putting all of our JavaScript files in /app/assets, we’ll put them in app/javascript/packs. To include this folder, all we have to do is include them in our main html files ‘head’ section.

# app/views/layouts/application.html.erb

<%= javascript_pack_tag 'application' %>

Now our files will be included and we can get coding. Let’s create the entry point to the angular app. Create a new folder and file in our views folder:
app/views/application/angular_home.html. Now we need a route. Let’s add it to our routes.rb file.


root to: 'application#angular_home'

Let’s add something to our angular_home file.

# app/views/application/angular_home.html

Goodbye World

# LOL?

Now run ‘rails s’ in your terminal and head on over to ‘locahost:3000’ in your browser. We should see ‘Goodbye World’ on the webpage. Now look in the console (Apple Control ‘J’) and you should see ‘Hello World from Webpacker’. We’re in business.

I think this is a good place to leave off. Our backend is set up. Webpack is setup. We have an entry point to Angular. Things are looking good. Next week we’ll dive head first into Angular. Working with modules and all the goodness that comes with ES6! Until then…cheeeeeers:)

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